Customers

Here are a few quotes from some happy customers about Garden City Books :

“We were recommended by a friend to ask Sarah to help sort out a bookcase of antiquarian books that we’d recently inherited. This was just one item from a large consignment of antiques which were taking over our ground floor, including some Georgian furniture, paintings, bookbinding equipment even some old sewing things. Sarah arranged valuations and transportation to two auction houses, and we were pleased with the amount of money raised and her continous advice throughout”

Helen and Daniel Shabetai, Welwyn Garden City September 2014

“Sarah has helped to realise some significant proceeds from the disposal of my late father’s library that included a mixture of books and conditions, from Georgian poetry and classics, First Edition Dickens to 20th century Architectural and garden design. She has kept us informed throughout the auction and online sales process and I have felt comfortable in asking her advice about other antiques.

Most notably this included a small leather case owned by my grandfather Alfred Tinniswood, who died at the end of World War 1. It contains his diaries, letters and sketch books and although we’ve decided not to sell, it has been useful to obtain some valuations for insurance purposes”

Nigel Roper, Olney, May 2014

“We have been very pleased with Sarah Goodman’s work in selling a wide variety of unusual and rare books on our behalf. She is always thoroughly professional and efficient, and we have repeatedly been pleasantly surprised by the amounts she has managed to raise for us.”

David and Susan Mayor, Welwyn Acupunture, Welwyn Garden City 2013

“Back in 2010 I had to clear my mother’s house of contents which included a large quantity of thousands of books, ranging from modern paperbacks to old and quite rare books.

Sarah was referred to me by my neighbour Naomi Shaw, (who is a voluntary bookseller for Oxfam) so she could advise on the rarer books. They both then worked together as a project to clear the house of books and to try to realise some values for the rarer ones.

A lot of work went into sorting which ones were suitable for Oxfam to sell or recycle. For the rarer books a further stage involved researching on-line values to identify which would be suitable to sell on-line . They suggested a commission sales structure based on the book values which seemed entirely reasonable.

It was during this process that they found some books with a rather wider range of values for which they suggested seeking a second opinion. Sarah suggested taking a few to the Antiques Roadshow which was coming to Hatfield House. Happily the expert Dominic Winter took a shine to them and valued one:  Boswell’s Corsica at £5-6,000 on camera.

But the story didn’t end there. Sarah persuaded Dominic to view the rest of the library owned by my great grandfather, Sir George Radford, who had collected books by/about Samuel Johnson and his biographer James Boswell. I quickly accepted their suggestion to auction around 100 of the more valuable books, for which Sarah became point of contact, liaising with Dominic and updating me with sale estimates, agreeing reserves, and updating me with results. Sarah also helped with some research along the way and confirmed that Sir George Radford had been a member of the Johnson Club, a Victorian Literary Society who were also collectors of Johnsonalia, which proved an important link in the provenance.

I have been extremely pleased with the results achieved, as the auction sales made just under £50,000 in total. The house was cleared of books within a 6 week period and Oxfam have also benefited. The on-line sales have also done well; the total being in the region of £2000. Sarah also advised and successfully auctioned some antique maps which realised £2,000.

Apart from the successful results it was a great help to me having Sarah and Naomi on the case as it allowed me to continue working in Oxford whilst knowing the house and contents were being safely dealt with in Hertfordshire.”

Helen Morton, Oxford, 2012.